Named after rural share taxis, MATATU is a performative think tank that shuttles local audiences to global destinations via film & performance. The platform engages in a public inquiry around the role of the African Diaspora in a contemporary urban American context, asking, “How does an Afro-Future actually materialize without some intentional framing by creative citizens from around the Diaspora,” and “Where are the occasions to envision strategies for health in post-colonial Black culture?”

Named after rural share taxis, MATATU is a performative think tank that shuttles local audiences to global destinations via film & performance. The platform engages in a public inquiry around the role of the African Diaspora in a contemporary urban American context, asking, “How does an Afro-Future actually materialize without some intentional framing by creative citizens from around the Diaspora,” and “Where are the occasions to envision strategies for health in post-colonial Black culture?”



The MATATU Flag Program is driven by our art director, Julie Munsayac, whose hand drawn emblems pay homage to the Haitian vodou tradition. We look upon our featured presenters as ambassadors, and our featured films as flags–as documentation that these nations exist. Flags are occasionally offered for purchase, benefiting nations of the global diaspora via Médecins Sans Frontières.


White Paper 2018

What is the individual both within and outside of their group? What is the diasporic experience of group membership and how does geography shape understandings of identity? What are the implications for identity construction when one’s identity is shaped by two or more competing groups? How does one exchange one group membership for another? Where do we find opportunities for group identities to resist and subvert? How do we find ourselves invested in dominant understandings, and when should we reject them? How do these understandings shape the way we interact with members of our group — whatever it may be — and other groups? How do we knowingly and unwittingly negotiate or perpetuate group hierarchies within our society and between societies?

In this interrogation of the group, we must ground our inquiries in critical understandings of indigeneity. Not only because of the reduction of indigenous epistemologies to "non-expert," but because of our own productions on stolen and settled land—presently and historically, Ohlone land. We consider this decolonization-aspirant geographic orientation on and within Turtle Island just as “post”-apartheid southern African countries engage the long-standing land question, i.e. whether (and how) land can be expropriated from white land “owners” and returned to Black African natives without compensating said white “owners.” While we might support these kinds of policies in far far away South Africa/Zimbabwe/Namibia, how might we apply that internationalist support to our domestic non-indigenous possession and use of land in the settler kleptocracy that we call the United States?